When should I use 'has been', 'have been' and 'had been'?

When should I use 'has been', 'have been' and 'had been'?



When should I use 'has been', 'have been' and 'had been'?

How?

Sentences that use 'has been', 'have been' and 'had been' are all formed from the auxiliary verb 'to have' conjugated with the past participle of the main verb. However, there are subtle differences in their usage.

– 'Has been' is used when we talk about an action or situation that began in the past and has repercussions in the present. For example: “He was elected president. » This sentence indicates that the person was elected president in the past, but is still president now.

– 'Have been' is used when the action or situation began in the past but continues into the present. For example: “They have been friends since childhood. » This sentence indicates that their friendship started in the past and it still lasts until now.

– 'Had been' is used to describe an action or situation that happened before another action or situation in the past. For example: “He had been promoted before he resigned. » This sentence indicates that the promotion took place before the resignation.

Why?

The use of 'has been', 'have been' and 'had been' depends on the context and the timeline of events. They are used to express different temporal nuances and show the relationship between past and present actions or situations.

For example, when you use 'has been', you emphasize that the action started in the past and has an influence on the present. This can be helpful when describing recent accomplishments or current situations.

On the other hand, 'have been' emphasizes the continuity of the action or situation from the past to the present. This can be used to describe long-term experiences or lifelong relationships.

'Had been' is used to show that the action or situation happened before another action or situation in the past. This can be used to describe a sequence of events or a cause and effect relationship.

When?

– Use 'has been' when you want to emphasize an action or situation that began in the past and has repercussions in the present.
Example: “She was in France for a year and she speaks French fluently now. »

– Use 'have been' when you want to emphasize an action or situation that began in the past and continues to the present.
Example: “We have been working on this project for months and we are proud of it. »

– Use 'had been' when you want to emphasize an action or situation that happened before another action or situation in the past.
Example: “I had been to this beautiful place before it was destroyed. »

Or?

The rules for using 'has been', 'have been' and 'had been' apply in all contexts and situations where we are talking about something that happened in the past and is linked to the present or another past action.

Who?

The people, situations, things and materials that may be relevant to the use of 'has been', 'have been' and 'had been' will depend on the specific context of the discussion or writing. It can be any person, relationship, experience, business, etc., that has a temporal relationship to other past or present actions.

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